Classes

RS 5540: Population, Place & The Environment

Sprin 2018 Highlights:

In this class we learn about how communities have leveraged social capital for change.  This year we attempted to create and leverage our own community’s social capital by working with environmental artist Jacklyn Brickman. Jacklyn helped to lead our class in creating a pop-up public art event: Social Lawn Art: Investigations in Population, Place & the Environment  

Students examining an interactive art piece in our public art event. This work was created by Katie Brown, Alana Chriest, Eric Swanson, and Tiffany Williams.  The wooden tracks represent the railroad tracks that separate neighborhoods in Columbus. The piece uses demographic maps in Columbus, Ohio to show how these physical barriers are an important part of maintaining racial and economic segregation.  

Students examining an interactive art piece in our public art event. This work was created by Katie Brown, Alana Chriest, Eric Swanson, and Tiffany Williams.  The wooden tracks represent the railroad tracks that separate neighborhoods in Columbus. The piece uses demographic maps in Columbus, Ohio to show how these physical barriers are an important part of maintaining racial and economic segregation.  

 

Course Info: Rural Sociology 5540 is a popular course for graduate students studying environmental social science and a suggested elective for EEDS students in the community development specialization. This specialization helps students, “develop a conceptual understanding of community, development and the environment and acquire the skills needed to implement positive social, economic and environmental change.”  This course meets the goals of this specialization, and graduate student interests in this area, by helping students understand how societies define “community” and how these definitions impact people’s lives and the world. We will also examine the mechanisms through which social change has occurred throughout history as well as how communities (and how might we) try to harness these mechanisms to create change. Finally, we will unpack what “positive” social change is, asking: Who defines what “positive” change is and why? Who is impacted by this definition? What are current strategies underway to create positive change and are they working?   

 

RS 7560: Environmental Sociology

Course Info:  This course was developed using a backward design process.  In this method the designer starts with delineating the goals of the course, how this course is meant to contribute to your education as an individual.  These goals are then lined up with quantifiable learning objectives and assignments which will help you reach these objectives.  This design is located at the end of this syllabus for your review.  The major goals of this course surround developing your understanding of how the physical environment affects our social environment and vice versa. This class pulls from the fields of: environmental policy, sociology, public health, environmental behavior and public opinion in order to help students explore the various forms of interaction between human society and the environment.  At the end of this class students should gain a better understanding of the relationship between society and the environment as well as acquire skills on engaging with organizations and legislators working on these issues.